Llyn Llydaw and Y Lliwedd, Snowdonia, Wales

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Llyn Llydaw, Y Lliwedd, Snowdonia, Wales, UK copyright: charles kenwright/ www.openmind-images.com

Llyn Llydaw, Y Lliwedd, Snowdonia, Wales, UK copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Another image of Y Lliwed and the ruins of the copper mines. This time it´s a two shot panorama using a 28mm lens. On the left is the reservoir, Llyn Llydaw. I´m not sure if the miners who toiled there all those years ago had much time to take in the grandeur of this Welsh mountain cwm, probably not, but it´s a wonderfully impressive place. And, for me, a black and white landscape – maybe it´s got to do with it´s history, maybe it´s the monochrome power of the massive cliffs on Y Lliwed, maybe it´s both, anyway, here it is, in all it´s black and white grandeur!

Towards Rhoscolyn Head, Anglesey Coastal Path, Wales

Anglesey Coastal Path Charles Kenwright

Anglesey Coastal Path, Wales
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

I took this on the stretch from Treardurr to Four Mile Bridge. The Coastal Path, with a length of somewhat over 200 kms, runs through a wonderful and varied landscape. Taking this island at walking pace allowed us the time to really appreciate this beautiful coastline.

Every Journey Starts With…..

In this case, a train journey. We´ve just finished the Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path. We reached Holyhead, the start of our 200km round walk, by train from Chester station. The distance sign, opposite our platform, seemed to be a good start to our 12 day journey around the coast of Anglesey.

Chester Station

Chester Station, England
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Abandoned Brickworks, Porth Wen, Anglesey, Wales, UK

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Porth Wen Charles Kenwright

Abandoned Brickworks, Porth Wenn, Anglesey
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

This old ruin is situated on the north coast of Anglesey. It was originally built to produce refractory bricks for the steel industry, the bricks being exported directly from it´s own dock. It closed down at the start of the Great War.

The Mersey Docks and Harbour Board’s Pilot Jetty at Point Lynas, Anglesey, UK

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Point Lynas Charles Kenwright

The Mersey Docks and Harbour Board’s Pilot Jetty at Point Lynas, Anglesey, UK
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Anglesey lies in the approaches to the River Mersey and the port of Liverpool. This jetty at Point Lynas, just next to the small lighthouse, is sometimes used by Mersey Pilots to board their Cutters and go out to the waiting ships to guide them into the River Mersey. Point Lynas is situated on the north east side of the island. I took this shot at 6.30pm., it was already getting dark and the light was failing quickly, which for me, only added to the mystery and beauty of the place.

Tennis Shoe, Idwal Slabs, North Wales

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Tennis Shoe, Idwal Slabs Charles Kenwright

Tennis Shoe, Idwal Slabs, North Wales
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

The date on this Kodachrome is August 1985, and I´m sure it was a Wednesday evening. After reading my last post, you might ask yourself, where has the amnesia gone? I´m sure it was a Wednesday because, for a number of years, I used to race out to North Wales after leaving work early on Wednesdays and get a rock route in. I climbed Tennis Shoe, this evening with Craig. It´s interesting looking at this shot because the thing that really dates it is the Firé rock boots that Craig is wearing. If I remember correctly, they were the first rock boots with sticky soles (thanks to Formula 1 tires I think).

Tennis Shoe is a classic multi pitch slab climb which works it´s way up the left side of Idwal Slabs, it´s only Hard Severe (now that´s also a dated form of grading) with the crux moves, on the last pitch, at about 4b – they were pretty polished even then, so I guess it might feel even more tricky now. They come on a steeping of the wall at the top of the route, and are a couple of thin moves – but that´s it really. It´s a wonderful climb and, although I´ve done it quite a few times, it´s always been fun. I think it was first done in about 1919, solo by the great Noel Odell. It´s name comes from the practice of wearing tennis shoes when doing more delicate rock climbs.

After doing the last pitch, one can carry on up routes like Lazarus and then up onto the walls above that for a long mountaineering day. Or one can climb down the gully (fun in itself when wet) past Suicide Wall.

Those summer evenings in North Wales usually entailed having a pint somewhere on the drive home. They were wonderful evenings, now more than 25 years ago.

 

The Perch Rock Bouy, Penmon Point, Anglesey, North Wales, UK

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The Perch Rock Bouy, Anglesey copyright: charles kenwright/ www.openmind-images.com

The Perch Rock Bouy, Anglesey
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Yesterday I posted a B&W of the Penmon Lighthouse, today I´m posting the bouy which marks Perch Rock. Perch Rock lies in the same channel between Penmon Point and Puffin Island, but is about 500 meters to the east of Penmon Lighthouse. Just as yesterday´s picture “had” to be B&W, so must this one be in colour!