Flower

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macro flower Charles Kenwright

Macro Flower
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Change of venue today – indoors! I was just playing around a bit, I´ve got an idea in my mind, but am no-where near realizing it in front of the camera yet. Non the less, I thought  I´d post this “work in progress”

Macro Zen-Photography #2

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Macro Flower charles kenwright

Macro Flower, Zen-Photography
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

This is a second macro Zen-Photograph I took yesterday. Again, focussing in on the “small” is like taking a long, deep, slow, breath of clean air. And “small” becomes very relative.

Macro Zen-Photography

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Macro Flower Zen Photography charles kenwright

Macro Flower, Zen-Photography
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Just been playing around a bit today. I like the control I can have with the Nikon macro flash system. Also this is a bit of zen-photography. As I think I´ve written before, the longer I observe a subject, the more I see and the more I can let it fill my thinking. A therapeutic way to spend a few hours.

Macro Photography of a Poppy Seed Pod

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Photography is about telling a story, it´s about informing the viewer in some way or another.  It doesn´t matter what photographic discipline you choose, it has to inform. Or is that not so? Tell me if you´ve another interpretation. Therefore, for me macro photography has to inform too. I find the macro structure of the pod very beautiful. But what also struck me about this view was the lip at the front reminded me of a rock face, a buttress – OK maybe I tend to see things to climb where others may not. I viewed and photographed the poppy from a number of angles and have decided to post this one.

Macro, poppy seed pod charles kenwright

Macro of a poppy seed pod.
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Macro photography, because of it´s reduced depth of field, has limitations but also great advantages, it focuses the eye on a small aspect of the subject, here the front of the seed pod. And because of this reduced depth of field, it allows me to discover an object in layers, it allows me to also see, at times, strange resemblance to other, much bigger objects – hence to the rock face. I also took one view of the poppy using the “deep focus” technique but I´m not happy with it, so it´s back to the table top for that one!

Moss, deep focus

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Winter is back again here. The only spot of colour in a gloomy wood was the moss. This moss growing on a rotten tree stump caught my eye. After taking a number of macro shots of bits of it, I decided to do a series pulling the focus between each one. After processing the RAW files in Capture One I exported them as TIFFs into Photoshop. I combined them as layers in one Photoshop file. Then by masking out the out of focus parts on each layer,   I´ve ended up with a deep focus of this piece of moss – I need to work a bit on the process though. It´s a technique that is fascinating and gives a sort of focus version of HDR. It´s not only good for macro but can also be used in landscape photography too. But, like HDR, it needs to be used carefully and sparingly.

Moss on a tree stump

Moss growing on a tree stump.
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Radicchio, Macro Photography

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For me macro photography is very similar to another photographic discipline, landscape photography. To be successful both require a meditation on the subject at hand. It makes no real difference if the subject is a mountain range, kilometre after kilometre wide and disappearing into a hazy infinity, or, as in the case of todays photograph, a halved Radicchio.  Both require study, observation, in fact one needs to get to know them“.

Radicchio

A Macro of a Radicchio
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Every time I prepare a radicchio for a salad (which I love) and I halve it in preparation to cutting it into small pieces, the shape of the inside fascinates me. It´s curves and folds have  a depth, are so complicated and intricate. It is simply beautiful. Every time I say to myself that I´ve simply got to photograph one. So yesterday at the market I chose a somewhat larger one – for a macro session. As is always the case – or so it seems to me – the real situation is different from the imagined one. This is also true of landscape photography. I played around with my radicchio for a few hours, changing view point, distance, focus, lighting, exposure – getting to know it. I feel that I´ve got to know it better, but am still a way from being close to it.

The meditation will continue!

The Sick Rose by William Blake

I stumbled across this poem by Blake and it gave me the idea of trying to represent this in a series of pictures. I photographed a rose over a number of weeks, documenting it´s decline. The next step of cutting the photographs together with music and the poem spoken over part of it was pretty obvious really.

I hope you enjoy it!

 

copyright: charles kenwright / http://www.openmind-images.com