In Print! Tate and Lyle, Google and Malcom

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Charles Kenwright

Tate and Lyle and Malcom´s story. Woodworking Plans and Projects
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

A few months ago I received an email from the editor in chief of the UK magazine “Woodworking Plans and Projects” asking if he could use one of my images. He wanted it to illustrate a story written by one of his readers. It told the story of how some of the wood saved from the demolition of the Tate and Lyle Sugar Refinery in Liverpool. UK, had been used in various woodworking projects. The editor had googled Tate and Lyle and the search result threw up a Blog article that I´d posted in February 2013. I was pleased that I could add to the readers enjoyment of the article – hopefully.

This enquiry and licensing of the use of one of my photographs highlighted a number of points for me. The first being that a photograph that I´d taken more than 40 years ago still had a use today. The second being, as well as fun, how useful blogging can be. The third, how important search engine optimization (SEO) is. And last but not least, the importance of picture captions and that they should say something useful about the photograph.

Going back to the first point, a photograph never looses it´s power to say something, to illustrate something and to bring back memories. I can still remember walking through the remains of the Liverpool dockland as they went under the wreckers ball and disappeared for ever or was spruced up into a sort of Disney World of the British nautical and industrial past. It also brings back harder memories of strife, poverty and division that was so much part of the British story of the 1980s.

By the way, the now long gone Tate and Lyle Sugar Refinery and it´s demise still has an important place in Liverpool folklore. No-one can know how something – even an ugly building – or a photograph of it´s innards being ripped out, can retain meaning.

I really should get on with scanning more of my old negatives and positives and getting them archived and online – who knows what stories are buried there, and for who!

The Steam Ship Manxman

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SS Manxman Charles Kenwright

The SS Manxman, taken at Birkenhead Docks
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

I took this shot of the SS Manxman through the window of a derelict dock building in Birkenhead. The historic passenger ferry was built at Cammell Lairds shipbuilders and launched in 1955. She sailed between Liverpool, the Isle of Man and Ireland until she was withdrawn from service in 1982 – it was shortly after this that I took the photograph whilst wandering around the docks.

There have been many attempts down the years to save her, turning her into floating squash courts, I seem to remember was one scheme, but all to no avail. The last I heard she was headed for the breakers yards, where I guess she met her end. If I´m wrong and someone has other news of the Manxman, please feel free to comment here!

Tate and Lyle Sugar Refinery, Liverpool, UK

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I took this in the 1980s down at Liverpool docks. It captures the demise of another piece of Liverpool industry,  the Tate and Lyle sugar refinery. As was often the case, such industry was positioned near where the raw product came ashore, in this case, sugar. As the Liverpool docks died, or were killed off, so died the industry that relied upon them. It´s a redevelopment of the site, or at least that´s what´s on the sign. Next time I´m there I´ll have to try and find the site again to see if it was redeveloped and into what, or if it´s still just an empty site. – After doing soe looking around on the www, I can now answer that question. The refinery area was turned into a housing co-operative, “The Eldonian Village”. So something good did come out of the disaster of at least 1500 lost jobs.

Tate and Lyle Sugar Refinery

Tate and Lyle Sugar Refinery, Liverpool Docks, UK.
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

I´ve now found out more information about the demise of Tate and Lyle in Liverpool. This is an interesting site and check the film out too!

Boathouse, Chiemsee, Bavaria, Germany

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The Chiemsee, also called the Bavarian Sea, is the third largest lake in Germany and one of it´s most beautiful lakes, it´s setting in the eastern pre-alps is idyllic. On one of it´s three main islands, Herrenchiemsee, King Ludwig II (mad King Ludwig) built a copy of the Palace of Versailles in 1878. It´s open to tourists during the summer. Ted Mundy, one of the main characters in John LeCarrés´novel, “Absolute Friends” worked as a tour guide there – just a piece of totally useless information for you.

Boathouse Chiemsee

Boathouse, Chiemsee, Bavaria, Germany
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Pont du Garde, Remoulins, France

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The Roman aqueduct across the Gardon River near Remoulins was built during the first century AD to supply the city of Nimes with water. It was nominated as a UNESCO Welt Heritage Site in 1985.

Pont du Garde

Pont du Garde, Roman Aqueduct
copyright: charles kenwright/ openmind-images.com

A Shooting Hide, Bavaria, Germany

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Because hunting is wide spread in Bavaria, these platforms dot the landscape. They also provide a useful elevated camera position too.

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Shooting Hide, Bavaria, Germany
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Before the tarting up – before UNESCO

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I took this down near Albert Dock, Liverpool, UK., before it was decided to rescue the place and turn it into a sort of salty Disneyland. The place was dripping, dirty and had more than started to crumble. But non the less it was monumental, awe inspiring, in your face and I loved it. Now when I go there it´s with mixed feelings – glad parts have been saved but sad because it´s original reason for existence is gone. Then it was “Set a course for Californi-ay” now it´s pictures of Bill Shankly and The Beatles Museum.

Liverpool Docks

copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

 

Fishing boat, the River Dee Estuary, Wirral, UK

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The River Dee Estuary is one of the most evocative landscapes – for me at least! It´s wide open spaces, big sky, and in winter, huge flocks of wading birds draw me to it. When I´m on the Wirral an Estuary visit with maybe a walk over to Hilbre Island is a must do.

Fishing boat, Dee Estuary, Wirral, UK

copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com