Copper Mine, Snowdonia, North Wales

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Copper Mine and Y Lliwedd, Snowdonia, North Wales. copyright: charles kenwright/ www.openmind-images.com

Copper Mine and Y Lliwedd, Snowdonia, North Wales. copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

I´ve often walked past these ruins of the old copper mines on the Miners Track. I was usually on the way to do a climb on Y Lliwedd or in winter, one of the Trinity snow gullies on Yr Wyddfa, Snowdon. But this visit I wanted to photograph them, hopefully with some moody lighting. The weather was clearing as I got there, but at least there were still some clouds above Y Lliwedd in the background.

There´s a tremendous sense of history here. Industrial history with the copper mine, mountaineering history with Y Lliwedd. At the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th Centuries Y Lliwed was one of the prime crags for the still young sport of rock climbing.    It´s a big crag, one where it´s easy to get off route on. There is also mythological history here too,  King Arthur is rumoured to be buried in a cave somewhere on the Y Lliwedd face, ready to spring forth when the kingdom is in danger.

Descending Weissmies, Mischabel Alps, Switzerland

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I took these shots after climbing the Weismiess (4017m). in September. If you´d like to view the complete Mischabel gallery please go here

Weissmies Charles Kenwright

Descending the impressive Serac barrier on Weissmies
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Weissmies Charles Kenwright

A close-up of the impressive Serac barrier on Weissmies
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Weissmies Charles Kenwright

A wide shot of the impressive Serac barrier on Weissmies showing part of the Trift Glacier
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Autumnal Trees below the Lenggries Hut

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Lenggries Hut Charles Kenwright

Autumnal trees below the Lenggries hut.
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

This area of the Bavarian Pre-alps has a lot of forest. The deciduous trees´leaves are all turning now, giving splashes and points of colour in an otherwise sombre scene.

If you´d like to see the picture gallery, then please go here.

Early Morning view of the Wetterstein Massif

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Zugspitze Charles Kenwright

Looking over towards the Zugspite from the Seekarkreuz
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

The weather forecast for last weekend was perfect! After a lot of snow early in the week, a high was forecast to appear on Friday, bringing with it good weather and a mixture of sun and cloud for the weekend. So I was up at the Lenggries hut in the Bavarian Prealps on Saturday to photograph the sunset and Sunday´s dawn. But the best laid plans etc. – the weather kicked in rain which basically washed out the photography on Saturday. Non the less on Sunday I was up early, left the hut in the dark and tramped up through soft, wet snow to the summit of Seekarkreuz (1600m) to see what would happen. As it turned out I did get some interesting and moody lighting, which this shot of the Zugspitze (2962m), Germany´s highest mountain, shows. A hole in the clouds allowed the sun to strike the snow fields on the mountain to the right of the Zugspitze for a few minutes.

Then it was down to the hut for breakfast and a welcome coffee. Needles to say, as I came out of the forest on the way down to the car, I was met by warm sunshine. Typical really, but “no pain, no gain” and I was pleased with the results from the Seekarkreuz!

 

Winter´s Return, Wallis, Switzerland

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Allalinhorn Charles Kenwright

The Hohlaubgrad and the Rimpfischorn
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Winter is never far away above 3000 meters. It had snowed in the night up at the Britannia Hut (3030m) and we awoke to see the rocks around the hut covered in snow. The day was cold, windy and seemed to have jumped a few months into the winter season. The strong winds, though, blew the clouds through at great speed which gave us  constantly changing views. This photograph shows the lower part of the Hohlaubgrat dropping down from the Allalinhorn and, behind that,  the lower part Rimpfischorn lit by the early morning sun.

The Allalin Glacier, Wallis, Switzerland

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Allalin Glacier Charles Kenwright

The Allalin Glacier, Wallis, Switzerland
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Yesterday I posted the last couple of meters below the Strahlhorn summit; today it´s a general view taken from the Britannia hut (3030m) looking south. The large glacier is the Allalin Glacier. From left to right, the lower mountain is the Fluchthorn (3790m), behind that is the Strahlhorn (4190m) then comes the impressive Rimpfischhorn (4198m) and the Hohlaubgrad of the Allalinhorn (4027m).

Maybe from here one could ask why it took 6 hours to summit on the Strahlhorn, in fact it does´t look that far away. But what one can´t see from this vantage point is the dead ground which has to be crossed on the right of the picture into the Hohlaub Glacier and then across a couple of rocky ridges before the Allalin Glacier is even reached. In fact, from the hut, 200 valuable meters altitude are lost before the real ascent can begin.

Nearing the summit of the Strahlhorn (4190m) Wallis Alps, Switzerland

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Strahlhorn Charles Kenwright

Just under the summit of the Strahlhorn, Wallis Alps, Switzerland
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

I´ve just got back from a week in the Wallis Alps in Switzerland. This shot was taken just below the summit of the Strahlhorn. Although only 190 meters over the magical 4000 meter level, it took us 6 long hot and sweaty (at least for me) hours to get to this point from the Britannia hut. This area of the Wallis Alps is near the Matterhorn and also goes under the name of Mischabel.

Sunset, Stripsenjoch, Kaisergebirge, Tirol Austria

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Stripsenjoch Charles Kenwright

Sunset, Stripsenjoch, Kaisergebrige, Tirol Austria
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

Last Friday I walked up to the Stripsenjoch Hut in the Kaiser Mountains. The sun is sinking behind the Brandenberg Alps, more commonly known as the Rofan Mountain Massif and the Karwendel Mountain Range. Between my camera tripod and the mountains lies the Kaiser Valley and the River Inn.

The limestone Kaisergebirge and particularly the Wilder Kaiser are of seminal importance in the history of mountaineering and rock climbing. It is here that, for over one hundred years, climbers have pushed the limits of what was considered possible. And the mountain refuge hut on the Stripsenjoch ( joch = pass or col) is right next to classic rock climbing mountains like the Predigstuhl, Fleischbank und Totenkirchl.

Morning at the Greizer Hut, Zillertal Alps, Austria

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Greizer Hut Charles Kenwright

Greizer Hut, Zillertal Alps, Austria
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

I´ve just got back from four days in the Zillertal Alps in Austria. This view is from the Greizer Hut looking roughly north along the cloud shrouded Floite Valley.

Franz Josef Glacier, South Island, New Zealand

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Franz Josef Glacier Charles Kenwright

Franz Josef Glacier, South Island New Zealand
copyright: charles kenwright/ http://www.openmind-images.com

The Franz Josef Glacier, together with the Fox Glacier descend into lush temperate rainforest. The Franz Josef Glacier has a link with the photograph I posted yesterday – for it was named for the Austrian Emperor, Franz Josef by Julius von Haast in 1865.

As with most natural features in New Zealand, it already had a Maori name, Ka Roimata o Hinehukatere, The Tears of Hinehukatere. The legend goes that Hinehukatere loved climbing mountains and persuaded her lover, Wawe, to accompany her. He was not as experienced as Hinehukatere and one day he was swept to his death by an avalanche. Hinehukatere was broken hearted and her many many tears flowed down the mountain and froze to form the glacier. I think the Maori name wonderful, and much better than naming it after a rather pompous and distant Austrian emperor – although he was reportedly to have been a cold sort of a person.

We unfortunately didn´t get up on the glacier because we were not kitted out for such travel, shame really but there it is.